i Cryptic Crossword 2224 Quixote

March 26, 2018

Our first regular reprint from 2014 I believe, and all the way into April at that, and it’s Quixote as expected, but for me at least with a bit of a bite. The majority of this was the usual pretty straightforward Monday fare, but then there was 13ac – which I failed on (never heard of the colour, or the town), and 19ac – which I did get, but without recourse to a dictionary could just as easily have been ANSATE. Anybody else throw in a hasty LEARNERS at 14d? Oh well, perhaps you got on a little better this morning.

COD? I was toying with the idea of nominating 18ac, just because it’s unusually rude for the Don, or 3d because it’s a nice spot, if fairly obvious, but I’ll go with 24ac because it threw me for an age – “Possibly a small bit without soft edge (7)”.

All the answers, parsing and more can be found here:

http://www.fifteensquared.net/2014/04/14/independent-8579quixote/

7 Responses to “i Cryptic Crossword 2224 Quixote”

  1. batarde said

    Oooh look – Sprouthater’s favourite singer! Yup, a little bit trickier than Quixote’s norm, but I certainly enjoyed it. The Oxfordshire town was my last in and produced a groan, but the COD also held proceedings up a touch. As for 19ac, I put in “ansate” with a shrug because looking it up was too much of a hassle. Serves me right.

  2. sprouthater said

    I did know the town, admittedly after consulting a list of colours, I got lost in its huge and awful “Shopping Village” just last year. Made things difficult for myself by entering Shreds at 2dn and failed at 19ac another “ansate”

  3. Cornick said

    DNF. I’ll never understand why the Don, having composed a puzzle that’s mostly ideal for the novice setters people keep saying they recommend him to, goes and throws in a word like Ansatz which appears neither in Collins nor Chambers. ‘Assets’ would have fitted just as well, and then those novices would have had the satisfaction of completion. Strange.

  4. dtw42 said

    Failed on 13 and 19 here after an otherwise simple solve. Again, all I could think of was ANSATE but it definitely didn’t fit the def, and had never heard of ANSATZ (plus it’s not an etymologically guessable obvious “oh that must be a thing” sort of a word).

  5. Two new words I’d never heard of: “a brownish-yellow pigment made from the soot of burnt wood”, and “an assumption about the form of an unknown function which is made in order to facilitate solution of an equation or other problem”.

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