i Cryptic Crossword 1688 Klingsor

July 7, 2016

A thoroughly enjoyable puzzle from Klingsor today that I didn’t find as hard as some back in the day, perhaps just a little more difficult than par. If you didn’t understand the wordplay for 11ac, that’s because it’s wrong, as detailed by the setter himself in the comments on the original blog. It originally read “Becoming a landlord on acquiring tenant’s first money? (7)” which makes more sense. Thankfully with some checking letters it was also clear what the answer should be. Apparently 28ac was also incorrect in the original online version, but not the dead tree one.

Lots of ticks by the clues, but I had to pick one, so COD goes to 20ac – ‘Colour gold’s alien to artist (10)’.

November 2011 once more:

http://www.fifteensquared.net/2011/11/17/independent-7828-by-klingsor/

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3 Responses to “i Cryptic Crossword 1688 Klingsor”

  1. Cornick said

    I too found this pretty easy – All but finished over breakfast and spent the rest of the day wondering what was going on with 11a, convincing myself it had to be a printing error somehow because Klingsor himself just doesn’t make bad clues.
    Nice to see my suspicions confirmed, although ‘Being a landlord, set about acquiring tenant’s first money’ would have also worked.

  2. AndyT said

    I wouldn’t claim to have found this easy – about par for the Thursday course, which is to say a touch on the hard boiled side. A moderately gratifying solve with no significant quibbles (except for 11ac) and a couple of noteworthy clues, of which 15d was my favourite.

    Cornick: I like your version of 11. Whilst mulling over what had gone wrong I assumed that there was a missing “on”, but your way of doing it avoids having two three-letter crossword cliches in one clue, which can only be a good thing. 🙂

    • Cornick said

      Well thanks Andy, but Eileen in the comments at 225 got there first.
      The thng about Klingsor, and why I think I find him easier than some other setters or indeed easier than some other solvers do, is that he is mathematically rigorous and scrupulously fair, so you can completely trust him and need only solve it like a piece of maths.

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